Face-Sitting Demo At Parliament Takes On Sexist New Porn Laws

Article @ Morning Star, published 13 December 2014

Campaigners against new pornography laws provoked Westminster yesterday by performing a mass “face-sitting” in front of the Houses of Parliament.

The raunchy demonstration hoped to raise awareness over the sexist nature of the policies, which will see acts including on-camera female ejaculation banned.

Campaigner Kirsty Kuryakin said: “I’m here to protest against the new porn laws that are coming in which especially misogynistically restrict a lot of sex practices which are legal to do at home.

“So much of what is restricted is about females having control.”

Many attending identified as members of the LGBTQ community, which was said to be hard hit by the new rules.

Porn actor and sex worker Molly Malone told the Star they were showing support for a group “already stigmatised.”

Some of the things outlawed were “acts you can do regardless of whether you have issues around your genitals or your body.”

“There’s a huge swathe of our community that are gender-nonconforming who have found pornography and sex that doesn’t stigmatise them and to have that censored is to be told that it’s wrong, it’s dirty, it’s not normal and that it’s not OK.”

After a much-cheered and applauded rally, protesters staged a joint “face-sitting” session while singing Sit On My Face by Monty Python.

Christian activist Symon Hill said: “It’s important that we tackle sexual abuse and these regulations will do nothing to do that.

“In Parliament they are dragging their feet on properly investigating allegations of child abuse in Westminster and yet at the same time they are demonising and criminalising consensual adult sexual behaviour.”

Campaign group Object chief executive Roz Hardie said that there were “some real discrepancies between what is and isn’t currently prohibited,” but that more needs to be done to regulate pornography.

“What a new government of any political colour should be doing is looking at harm-based definitions of pornography, which looks at how porn could better be defined around harm rather than personal morality.”

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